Duke University Center for African and African American Research

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Zombie: The Haitian and American Realities Behind the Myth

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March 2015

  • March 02, 2015

    • "Bad Made Measure" a talk by Professor Katherine McKittrick (Queen's University)
    • The department of African and African American Studies invites you ro join us for a public lecture by Professor Katherine McKittrick. The talk will be followed by a Q & A. Light refreshments provided. Paper Abstract: This paper is a relational conversation nested in black studies, science studies of blackness and race, and black creative text. The discussion will address how the social production of biologically determinist racial scripts¿which extend from a biocentric conception of the human¿can be dislodged by bringing studies of blackness in/and science into conversation with autopoetics, black Atlantic livingness, weights and measures, and poetry (specifically M. NourbeSe Philip's Zong!). The underlying purpose of this paper is to think about how engaging interdisciplinarity and forging relational knowledges assists in anti-colonial academic research and teaching while also disrupting anti-black biocentric scripts. The event is co-sponsored by Women's Studies, Center for North American Studies, the Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Department of Literature.
    • New Southern African Film Series: The Forgotten Kingdom
    • The Forgotten Kingdom tells the story of a young man, Atang (Zenzo Ngqobe), who leaves Jozi to return to Lesotho where he must bury his estranged father in the remote mountainous village where he was born. He falls in love with his childhood friend, Dineo (Nozipho Nkelemba), now a radiant young schoolteacher, who quietly and fiercely looks after her HIV-positive sister, being kept out of sight by their father. Through Dineo and a young orphan boy, Atang is drawn toward the mystical beauty and hardships of the people and land he has forgotten, and faces his own bittersweet reckoning. Made with support from PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) Please RSVP to Amy Vargas-Tonsi at av71@duke.edu.
  • March 03, 2015

  • March 04, 2015

    • Jazz at the Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program.
  • March 06, 2015

    • Freestyle Friday
    • Join us at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture as we celebrate the vast contributions of the African diaspora through food, music, and fellowship.
  • March 18, 2015

    • Parody of Power in African Art
    • Professor Yomi Ola from Spellman College will give a talk entitled "Parody of Power in African Art" on Wednesday, March 18 at 3:00 PM in the Smith Warehouse, Bay 4, FHI Garage.
    • Jazz at the Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program.
  • March 19, 2015

    • Zombies: The Haitian And American Realities Behind The Myth Conference, March 19-21
    • Erol Josué is a Vodou High Priest, Celebrated Dancer & Director of the Haitian Bureau of Ethnology (Keynote Lecture & Performance) Reception to follow. Please RSVP to http://doodle.com/vkuf6khff9fqmz47. Please go to the Center for African and African American Research's webpage for the conference schedule http://caaar.duke.edu/lecture-series/zombie-conference Zombies are real. Zombies, or zonbi, actually exist in Haiti, though they are a small part of the rich Haitian cosmology and are quite different from the ever-changing US movie zombie. Some zonbi are simply ritually captured and mobilized spirits of the dead. Others are essentially people poisoned and enslaved based upon a secret society's judgment that they have committed an unforgiveable crime. Please join us for an unprecedented discussion about race and the use of black cultures in the fantasy of US popular culture, where we will give equal time to the realities of Haitian sacred and social life and the role of zombies within it. Hear from the leading priests and experts on race and the movie industry, monsters, the psychology of nightmares, Caribbean literature, and Haitian religion and society, as well as the Cuban and western African counterparts of the zonbi. And through the Haitian sacred dance performance and class on Friday, we will learn with both mind and body.
  • March 20, 2015

    • Zombies: The Haitian And American Realities Behind The Myth Conference, March 19-21
    • Please go to the Center for African and African American Research's webpage for the conference schedule http://caaar.duke.edu/lecture-series/zombie-conference Zombies are real. Zombies, or zonbi, actually exist in Haiti, though they are a small part of the rich Haitian cosmology and are quite different from the ever-changing US movie zombie. Some zonbi are simply ritually captured and mobilized spirits of the dead. Others are essentially people poisoned and enslaved based upon a secret society's judgment that they have committed an unforgiveable crime. Please join us for an unprecedented discussion about race and the use of black cultures in the fantasy of US popular culture, where we will give equal time to the realities of Haitian sacred and social life and the role of zombies within it. Hear from the leading priests and experts on race and the movie industry, monsters, the psychology of nightmares, Caribbean literature, and Haitian religion and society, as well as the Cuban and western African counterparts of the zonbi. And through the Haitian sacred dance performance and class on Friday, we will learn with both mind and body.
    • Freestyle Friday
    • Join us at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture as we celebrate the vast contributions of the African diaspora through food, music, and fellowship.
    • Feminist Theory Workshop
    • The annual Feminist Theory Workshop offers a unique opportunity for scholars to engage in sustained dialogue about feminist theory as a scholarly domain of inquiry. The "workshop" approach of this conference requires active participation of both presenters and attendees. This year's keynote speakers are: Anne-Emmanuelle Berger, Professor of Literature and Gender Studies, Centre d'études féminines et d'études de genre, University of Paris 8, and Adjunct Professor of French Literature, Cornell University Tina Campt, Professor of Women¿s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of the Africana Studies Program, Barnard College Lee Edelman, Fletcher Professor of English Literature, Tufts University Françoise Vergès, Consulting Professor of Political Sciences, Goldsmith College and the University of London, and the President of the Comité pour la Mémoire et l'Histoire de l'esclavage.
  • March 21, 2015

    • Feminist Theory Workshop
    • The annual Feminist Theory Workshop offers a unique opportunity for scholars to engage in sustained dialogue about feminist theory as a scholarly domain of inquiry. The "workshop" approach of this conference requires active participation of both presenters and attendees. This year's keynote speakers are:Anne-Emmanuelle Berger, Professor of Literature and Gender Studies, Centre d'études féminines et d'études de genre, University of Paris 8, and Adjunct Professor of French Literature, Cornell UniversityTina Campt, Professor of Women¿s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of the Africana Studies Program, Barnard CollegeLee Edelman, Fletcher Professor of English Literature, Tufts UniversityFrançoise Vergès, Consulting Professor of Political Sciences, Goldsmith College and the University of London, and the President of the Comité pour la Mémoire et l'Histoire de l'esclavage. - See more at: http://calendar.duke.edu/events/show?fq=id%3ACAL-8a0870ee-4be3d43a-014b-e50118d7-000043f7demobedework%40mysite.edu#sthash.bIsxuvF2.dpuf
    • Zombies: The Haitian And American Realities Behind The Myth Conference, March 19-21
    • Please go to the Center for African and African American Research's webpage for the conference schedule http://caaar.duke.edu/lecture-series/zombie-conference Zombies are real. Zombies, or zonbi, actually exist in Haiti, though they are a small part of the rich Haitian cosmology and are quite different from the ever-changing US movie zombie. Some zonbi are simply ritually captured and mobilized spirits of the dead. Others are essentially people poisoned and enslaved based upon a secret society's judgment that they have committed an unforgiveable crime. Please join us for an unprecedented discussion about race and the use of black cultures in the fantasy of US popular culture, where we will give equal time to the realities of Haitian sacred and social life and the role of zombies within it. Hear from the leading priests and experts on race and the movie industry, monsters, the psychology of nightmares, Caribbean literature, and Haitian religion and society, as well as the Cuban and western African counterparts of the zonbi. And through the Haitian sacred dance performance and class on Friday, we will learn with both mind and body.
  • March 25, 2015

    • Humanities Futures: Politics of Performance
    • Please join the FHI, Cultural Anthropology, Dance, and Literature for an interdisciplinary, cross-departmental seminar on "Politics of Performance" Follow event URL to see full program schedule. As part of our new Mellon initiative Seminars in Historical, Global, and Emerging Humanities, the FHI is partnering with Duke's 18 arts, humanities, and interpretive social sciences departments to organize a 3-year series of cross-departmental public seminars. Each Humanities Futures event brings together a sub-group of Duke humanities departments, in a joint exploration of the futures of the disciplines in light of the interdisciplinary developments of recent decades. This is the second event in the series.
    • "Is the International Community Abandoning the Fight Against Impunity?"
    • David Tolbert was appointed president of ICTJ in March of 2010. Previously he served as registrar (assistant secretary-general) of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon and prior to that was assistant secretary-general and special expert to the United Nations secretary-general on United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials. From 2004 to 2008 Mr. Tolbert served as deputy chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). In addition Mr. Tolbert taught international law and human rights at the post-graduate level in the United Kingdom and practiced law for many years in the United States.
    • Is the International Community Abandoning the Fight Against Impunity?
    • David Tolbert was appointed president of ICTJ in March of 2010. Previously he served as registrar (assistant secretary-general) of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon and prior to that was assistant secretary-general and special expert to the United Nations secretary-general on United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials. From 2004 to 2008 Mr. Tolbert served as deputy chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). In addition Mr. Tolbert taught international law and human rights at the post-graduate level in the United Kingdom and practiced law for many years in the United States.
    • Jazz at the Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program.
  • March 26, 2015

    • "Race and Rurality in the Global Economy" Keynote Address
    • Opening keynote address for "Race and Rurality in the Global Economy" workshop. This day and a half workshop will examine the contemporary state of development, and the fluid zones of rurality in the world economy through the optic of raciality. It will cover notably Asia, Africa and the Americas including the U. S. and the Caribbean. The arguments considered will pivot on heightened risks and multiple states of insecurity being faced given the forces of globalization and environmental change, and the steady decline in the livelihoods of people of color globally, their deepened vulnerabilities, and the complex reconstitution of systemic and lived racialization within this process.
  • March 27, 2015

    • "Race and Rurality in the Global Economy" Workshop
    • This day and a half workshop will examine the contemporary state of development, and the fluid zones of rurality in the world economy through the optic of raciality. It will cover notably Asia, Africa and the Americas including the U. S. and the Caribbean. The arguments considered will pivot on heightened risks and multiple states of insecurity being faced given the forces of globalization and environmental change, and the steady decline in the livelihoods of people of color globally, their deepened vulnerabilities, and the complex reconstitution of systemic and lived racialization within this process.
    • Freestyle Friday
    • Join us at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture as we celebrate the vast contributions of the African diaspora through food, music, and fellowship.
  • March 28, 2015

    • "Race and Rurality in the Global Economy" Workshop
    • The conference will bring to the fore-front the status of indigenous peoples, blacks and other people of color and center them in a dialogue investigating the outcomes of development in its various effects, namely culturally, economically, ecologically, and politically. It will advocate a critical studies approach to development that shifts the focus from modernization mantras impelling change from agrarian to industrial status, to probe instead into the various relational fields generating hybrid urban-rural spaces that problematize typical narratives of development. This means critically examining the constitution of spaces through the optics of race, land and rurality; questioning the nature of the development practices and rhetorical promises of development; understanding the racializing production of hi/stories (human identity stories) and the fissures they provoke within imaginations of progress; and critically tracking the haunted quest for sustainability, resilience in the management of global spaces. This intervention will thus enable a better engagement with the vital issues related to the wellbeing of diverse populations of color facing the potentially existential threats from globalization and climate change.
  • March 30, 2015

    • Eitan Bar-Yosef: Africa in Israeli Culture: Fantasies and Encounters
    • Eitan Bar-Yosef (Ben Gurion University) discusses his work on "Africa in Israeli Culture: Fantasies and Encounters." Eitan Bar-Yosef is a literary scholar and cultural historian specializing in Victorian studies and postcolonialism. His work has focused on British Imperial culture with an emphasis on Britain's colonial interests in Palestine, the role played by Anglo-Jewry in the making of Empire, and the relationship between Zionist culture and British colonialism. More recently, he has turned his attention to Israeli literature and culture; his recent book was titled "A Villa in the Jungle: Africa in Israeli Culture." He is currently a research fellow at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan.

CAAAR cultivates the best of scholarship about Africa and its diaspora and broadcasts it beyond the ivy walls, not just for the sake of information but also in service to society. The Center is consciously interdisciplinary--encompassing all of the humanities and the social sciences-and international, embracing Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, Europe, and Asia. CAAAR supports initiatives by students, faculty, and other professionals in the Duke community, while encouraging collaborations with scholars and professionals worldwide.

J. Lorand Matory, Director.



















 
  • Serah Shani is presently at Yale University, Council on African Studies     Her areas of academic and research interest are: Globalization, Migration, Transnationalism, Political Anthropology, Africa and The African Diaspora, Anthropology, Applied Anthropology, Anthropology and Education, Race and Ethnicity studies, and Ethnographic Research


    Geographic Focus:Sub-Saharan Africa, the African Diaspora and the United states

    Languages: English, Swahili, Maasai, Kikuyu and Kisii

Carl James’ extensive background in youth work and community development informs his recent work on educational programs that are responsive to the particular needs, experiences, interests and aspirations of young people living in inner sub-urban contexts. He is particularly engaged in exploring avenues for making education more reflective of community interests, concerns and values, and on enhancing educational and occupational access and equity for marginalized youth.

Scholarly Interests

Equity in education related to ethnicity, race, social class, and gender; anti-racism and multicultural education; urban education; youth and sport; practitioner research; community development (social work); immigrant settlement; immigration and minority issues in Sweden; and social and educational issues in the Caribbean.

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