Duke University Center for African and African American Research

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Zombie: The Haitian and American Realities Behind the Myth

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February 2016

  • February 02, 2016

    • Screen/Society--2016 African Film Festival--"Faat Kine"
    • Film Screening: "Faat Kine" (Ousmane Sembene, 2001, 121 min, Senegal, in French and Wolof w/ English subtitles, Color, DVD) / A cheerful movie of simple pleasures, "Faat Kine" stars Venus Seye as the movie's eponymous heroine. Kine is the successful manager of a gasoline station in Dakar, and an unmarried mother of two, each the product of a failed relationship with a delinquent father. Independent, well-to-do, and equable, Kine flits between the demands of her job, her family and her friends with admirable composure. The movie follows Kine's activities with an unobtrusive eye, capturing matter-of-factly the eventfulness of daily life. Confrontations punctuate her relatively comfortable existence, from a tearful quarrel with her restive daughter to a roadside spat with a woman who accuses her of having an affair with her husband. Amid the bustle of Kine's day-to-day routine, the movie offers wistful flashbacks that explain Kine's complex but happy situation. The movie ends on a triumphant note at a party thrown by Kine for her son and daughter, where a climactic meeting between her son and his father offers an explicit glimpse into Sembene's outlook on Senegal's past and future. /--"A marvelous film, offering the psychological insight of Rohmer into its familial story, while contextualising it with a wise, vibrant African optimism all Sembène's own." -- Time Out / Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oeWt6TobT4 / NB: This 1st African screening is the only one in Griffith
  • February 03, 2016

    • Jazz @ The Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program. Jazz @ begins at 9:30pm and ends at 12:30am. Feel free to stay for just one set or for the entire evening. Comfortable attire and open to the public. Light hors d¿oeuvres and liquid refreshment will be provided with the option to enjoy late night fare and drinks in the Underground at the Mary Lou.
  • February 05, 2016

    • Freestyle Friday
    • Check us out each Friday for festive Freestyle Fridays in the Mary Lou! Each week will concentrate on a different theme in Black culture through music, food, and fellowship. 1pm-4pm every Friday!
  • February 09, 2016

    • Screen/Society--African Film Festival--"Daratt / Dry Season"
    • Film Screening: "Daratt / Dry Season" (Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, 2006, 96 min, Chad, in Arabic and French w/ English subtitles, Color, DVD) / Chad, 2006. After a forty-year civil war, the radio announces the government has just amnestied the war criminals. Outraged by the news, Gumar Abatcha orders his grandson Atim, a sixteen-year-old youth, to trace the man who killed his father and to execute him. Atim obeys him and, armed with his father's own gun, he goes in search of Nassara, the man who made him an orphan. He is bent on revenge. But instead of a cold-hearted killer, Atim finds a quiet, regal man. Nassara (Youssouf Djaoro) has left killing behind and now is married, goes to the mosque and owns a small bakery. Nassara takes on the young man as an apprentice baker and now Atim just waits for the right moment to strike. /-- Winner for Best Cinematography in Ouagadougou Panafrican Film and Television Festival (2007) and 5 awards in Venice Film Festival (2006)! / --"Using a simple storytelling style that grows stronger with each passing scene, "Dry Season" draws the viewer into its small two-character drama set in post-war Chad, while it offers a deep reflection on injustice and frustrated revenge."-- Variety / Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEjbCKpoF7Y // Light refreshments will be served.
  • February 10, 2016

    • Ra'nanan Alexandrowicz: "47 Years of Documentation"
    • Celebrated Israeli filmmaker Ra'nanan Alexandrowicz ("The Law in These Parts") comes to do Duke to give an archival presentation, "47 years of Documentation." This event/talk is structured around a sequence of archive footage segments collected by Alexandrowicz, all shot over the last 5 decades in the city of Hebron. It starts with the cinema newsreels of the late 60's, continues with the public television of the 70's and 80's, the long form documentary films of the 90's and runs all the way till the viral You tube clips of today. What the journey through archives of different periods and formats allows, is not only to visually tell the story of the city and its transformation in the last half century, but to focus on the documentation of the occupation as a phenomenon, to look at the way the documentation itself has evolved during this period of time and to raise questions about the relationship and affect between political and social reality and its documentation.
    • Jazz @ The Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program. Jazz @ begins at 9:30pm and ends at 12:30am. Feel free to stay for just one set or for the entire evening. Comfortable attire and open to the public. Light hors d¿oeuvres and liquid refreshment will be provided with the option to enjoy late night fare and drinks in the Underground at the Mary Lou.
  • February 12, 2016

    • Freestyle Friday
    • Check us out each Friday for festive Freestyle Fridays in the Mary Lou! Each week will concentrate on a different theme in Black culture through music, food, and fellowship. 1pm-4pm every Friday!
  • February 16, 2016

    • Islam as Black History
    • Join Edward Curtis and Jamillah Karim in conversation around questions about Islam as Black History and why is it important to integrate the study of Black history and Islam. How does the study of gender challenge both Islamic and Black history? What role does Africa play in Islamic history? Why is it important for U.S. Muslims to study Black history? Edward Curtis is Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is the author or editor of eight books, including The Call of Bilal: Islam in the African Diaspora (2014) and Muslims in America: A Short History, which was named one of the 100 best books of 2009 by Publishers Weekly. Curtis, who has been awarded Carnegie, Fulbright, NEH, and Mellon fellowships, is co-editor of the Journal of Africana Religions. Jamillah Karim is an award-winning author, lecturer, and blogger. Karim specializes in race, gender, and Islam in America. Her most recent academic appointment was as associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Spelman College, where she taught courses on the study of Islam for six years. She is the author of Women of the Nation: Between Black Protest and Sunni Islam (2014, with Dawn Marie-Gibson). She was recently highlighted as a young faith leader in the black community by JET magazine. Karim holds a Ph.D. in Islamic Studies from Duke University.
    • Screen/Society--African Film Festival--"Bab El-Oued City"
    • Film Screening: "Bab El-Oued City" (Merzak Allouache, 1994, 93 min, Algeria, in Arabic w/ English subtitles, Color, DVD) / "Bab el-Oued" is working class district of Algiers, shortly after the bloody riots of October 1988. Boualem is a young worker in the district bakery. He works hard at night and sleeps during the day. One morning, he commits a "foolish" act which puts the entire district in turmoil. A group of young extremists headed by Said, sets out in the search of the culprit of this "provocative" act with the intention of making an example by punishing him. Violence settles in and quickly develops when Yamina, Said's younger sister, is caught while meeting Boualem, with whom she is secretly in love. / -- Winner of FIPRESCI Prize at Cannes Film Festival (1994) and IMA Grand Prize at Paris Biennal of Arab Cinema (1994)! / -- "Merzak Allouache's feature contains one of the clearest and most persuasive depictions of the recent rise of Islamic fundamentalism."-- Chicago Reader // Light refreshments will be served.
  • February 17, 2016

    • Jazz @ The Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program. Jazz @ begins at 9:30pm and ends at 12:30am. Feel free to stay for just one set or for the entire evening. Comfortable attire and open to the public. Light hors d¿oeuvres and liquid refreshment will be provided with the option to enjoy late night fare and drinks in the Underground at the Mary Lou.
  • February 19, 2016

    • Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture
    • Duke University will host the "Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture" conference February 19-21. The second bi-annual conference brings together scholars, practitioners and educators for three days of intellectual discussion and artistic inspiration centered on global black dance. The theme for this conference is Afrofuturism, a 20th century artistic movement combining elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy and magical realism. The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance (CADD) is an egalitarian community of scholars and artists committed to exploring, promoting, and engaging African diaspora dance as a resource and method of aesthetic identity. Through conferences, roundtables, publications and public events, we aim to facilitate interdisciplinary inquiry that captures the variety of topics, approaches, and methods that might constitute Black Dance Studies. A diverse gathering of dance scholars and community members, The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance was conceptualized by its founding members and first convened in April 2012 as the African Diaspora Dance Research Group at Duke University. Duke students, staff and faculty may attend most conference events free.
    • Freestyle Friday
    • Check us out each Friday for festive Freestyle Fridays in the Mary Lou! Each week will concentrate on a different theme in Black culture through music, food, and fellowship. 1pm-4pm every Friday!
  • February 20, 2016

    • Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture
    • Duke University will host the "Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture" conference February 19-21. The second bi-annual conference brings together scholars, practitioners and educators for three days of intellectual discussion and artistic inspiration centered on global black dance. The theme for this conference is Afrofuturism, a 20th century artistic movement combining elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy and magical realism. The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance (CADD) is an egalitarian community of scholars and artists committed to exploring, promoting, and engaging African diaspora dance as a resource and method of aesthetic identity. Through conferences, roundtables, publications and public events, we aim to facilitate interdisciplinary inquiry that captures the variety of topics, approaches, and methods that might constitute Black Dance Studies. A diverse gathering of dance scholars and community members, The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance was conceptualized by its founding members and first convened in April 2012 as the African Diaspora Dance Research Group at Duke University. Duke students, staff and faculty may attend most conference events free.
  • February 21, 2016

    • Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture
    • Duke University will host the "Dancing the African Diaspora: Embodying the Afrofuture" conference February 19-21. The second bi-annual conference brings together scholars, practitioners and educators for three days of intellectual discussion and artistic inspiration centered on global black dance. The theme for this conference is Afrofuturism, a 20th century artistic movement combining elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy and magical realism. The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance (CADD) is an egalitarian community of scholars and artists committed to exploring, promoting, and engaging African diaspora dance as a resource and method of aesthetic identity. Through conferences, roundtables, publications and public events, we aim to facilitate interdisciplinary inquiry that captures the variety of topics, approaches, and methods that might constitute Black Dance Studies. A diverse gathering of dance scholars and community members, The Collegium for African Diaspora Dance was conceptualized by its founding members and first convened in April 2012 as the African Diaspora Dance Research Group at Duke University. Duke students, staff and faculty may attend most conference events free.
  • February 23, 2016

    • Screen/Society--African Film Festival--"White Wedding"
    • Film Screening: "White Wedding" (Jann Turner, 2009, 93 min, South Africa, in Zulu, Afrikaans, Xhosa, and English w/ English subtitles, Color, Blu-Ray) / It's modern day South Africa and in Cape Town the beautiful Ayanda (Zandile Msutwana) is just days away from achieving her lifelong dream: the perfect white wedding. The only problem is that her husband-to-be, the loyal, committed Elvis (Kenneth Nkosi) is 1800 kilometres away in Johannesburg. He sets off on Tuesday night by bus to Durban intending to connect with his childhood friend and best-man Tumi (Rapulana Seiphemo). But the plans start to go awry when Tumi doesn't show up at the bus station. Not an auspicious beginning, but this is just the first in many comic and illuminating misadventures they meet along the way. In the end, the two lovers learn that celebrating their union is more about the journey than getting to the church on time. / --"[A] pleasant, intentionally lightweight, South African road-movie romance with a sly integrationist political agenda."-- Boston Phoenix / Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4_DXRyz8D0 // Light refreshments will be served.
  • February 24, 2016

    • Jazz @ The Mary Lou
    • Fill your Wednesday evenings with live jazz and the exquisite company of jazz lovers from the campus and community in an energetic and engaging atmosphere. Enjoy live performances by local musicians as well as Duke music students, with special guest artists all brought together by John Brown, Director of the Duke Jazz Studies Program. Jazz @ begins at 9:30pm and ends at 12:30am. Feel free to stay for just one set or for the entire evening. Comfortable attire and open to the public. Light hors d¿oeuvres and liquid refreshment will be provided with the option to enjoy late night fare and drinks in the Underground at the Mary Lou.
  • February 26, 2016

    • Freestyle Friday
    • Check us out each Friday for festive Freestyle Fridays in the Mary Lou! Each week will concentrate on a different theme in Black culture through music, food, and fellowship. 1pm-4pm every Friday!

CAAAR cultivates the best of scholarship about Africa and its diaspora and broadcasts it beyond the ivy walls, not just for the sake of information but also in service to society. The Center is consciously interdisciplinary--encompassing all of the humanities and the social sciences-and international, embracing Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, Europe, and Asia. CAAAR supports initiatives by students, faculty, and other professionals in the Duke community, while encouraging collaborations with scholars and professionals worldwide.

J. Lorand Matory, Director.



















 
  • Serah Shani is presently at Yale University, Council on African Studies     Her areas of academic and research interest are: Globalization, Migration, Transnationalism, Political Anthropology, Africa and The African Diaspora, Anthropology, Applied Anthropology, Anthropology and Education, Race and Ethnicity studies, and Ethnographic Research


    Geographic Focus:Sub-Saharan Africa, the African Diaspora and the United states

    Languages: English, Swahili, Maasai, Kikuyu and Kisii

Carl James’ extensive background in youth work and community development informs his recent work on educational programs that are responsive to the particular needs, experiences, interests and aspirations of young people living in inner sub-urban contexts. He is particularly engaged in exploring avenues for making education more reflective of community interests, concerns and values, and on enhancing educational and occupational access and equity for marginalized youth.

Scholarly Interests

Equity in education related to ethnicity, race, social class, and gender; anti-racism and multicultural education; urban education; youth and sport; practitioner research; community development (social work); immigrant settlement; immigration and minority issues in Sweden; and social and educational issues in the Caribbean.

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